The Hazards of Lead (E.P.A Pamphlet)

On June 1, 1999 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a new rule that requires all "renovators", which includes painting contractors, to distribute an EPA-produced pamphlet to their customers before they begin a job that might involve disturbing lead-based paint. The pamphlet, titled "Protect Your Family From Lead In Your Home" describes the risk of the lead-based paint hazard, how it can affect young children, how lead gets into the body, and some safe approaches to working with it. Painting contractors are required to distribute it to any customer where the job will include disturbing (sanding, scraping, or other activities that disrupt the surface) more than two square feet (2 ft2) of lead-based paint in a house built before 1978.

We have included a copy of the pamphlet produced by the Environmental Protection Agency, for our customers as well as any other interested parties.

PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM LEAD IN YOUR HOME

ARE YOU PLANNING TO BUY, RENT, OR RENOVATE A HOME BUILT BEFORE 1978?

Many houses and apartments built before 1978 have paint that contains lead (called lead-based paint). Lead from paint, chips, and dust can pose serious health hazards if not taken care of properly. By 1996, federal law will require that individuals receive certain information before renting, buying, or renovating pre-1978 housing:

  • LANDLORDS will have to disclose known information on lead-based paint hazards before leases take effect. Leases will nclude a federal form about lead-based paint.
  • SELLERS will have to disclose known information on lead-based paint hazards before selling a house. Sales contracts will include a federal form about lead-based paint in the building. Buyers will have up to 10 days to check for lead hazards.
  • RENOVATORS will have to give you this pamphlet before starting work.

If you want more information on these requirements, call the National Lead Information Clearinghouse at 1-800-424-LEAD.

IMPORTANT!!!

Lead From Paint, Dust, and Soil Can Be Dangerous If Not Managed Properly!

  • FACT: Lead exposure can harm young children and babies even before they are born.
  • FACT: Even children that seem healthy can have high levels of lead in their bodies.
  • FACT: People can get lead in their bodies by breathing or swallowing lead dust, or by eating soil or paint chips with lead in them.
  • FACT: People have many options for reducing lead hazards. In most cases, lead-based paint that is in good condition is not a hazard.
  • FACT: Removing lead-based paint improperly can increase the danger to your family.

If you think your home might have lead hazards, read this pamphlet to learn some simple steps to protect your family.

LEAD GETS IN THE BODY IN MANY WAYS

  • 1 out of every 11 children in the United States has dangerous levels of lead in the bloodstream.
  • Even children who appear healthy can have dangerous levels of lead.*

People can get lead in their body if they:

  • Put their hands or other objects covered with lead dust in their mouths.
  • Eat paint chips or soil that contain lead.
  • Breathe in lead dust (especially during renovations that disturb painted surfaces).

Lead is even more dangerous to children than adults because:

  • Babies and young children often put their hands and other objects in their mouths.
  • These objects can have lead dust on them.
  • Children's growing bodies absorb more lead.
  • Children's brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead.

Lead's Effects

If not detected early, children with high levels of lead in their bodies can suffer from:

  • Damage to the brain and nervous system
  • Behavior and learning problems (such as hyperactivity)
  • Slowed growth
  • Hearing problems
  • Headaches

Lead is also harmful to adults. Adults can suffer from:

  • Difficulties during pregnancy
  • Other reproductive problems (in both men and women)
  • High blood pressure
  • Digestive problems
  • Nerve disorders
  • Memory and concentration problems
  • Muscle and joint pain

Lead affects the body in many ways.

CHECKING YOUR FAMILY FOR LEAD

  • Get your children tested if you think your home has high levels of lead.* A simple blood test can detect high levels of lead. Blood tests are important for:
  • Children who are 6 months to 1 year old (6 months if you live in an older home that might have lead in the paint).
  • Family members that you think might have high levels of lead.
  • If your child is older than 1 year, talk to your doctor about whether your child needs testing.
  • Your doctor or health center can do blood tests. They are inexpensive and sometimes free. Your doctor will explain what the test results mean. Treatment can range from changes in your diet to medication or a hospital stay.

WHERE LEAD-BASED PAINT IS FOUND

  • In general, the older your home, the more likely it has lead-based paint.
  • Many homes built before 1978 have lead-based paint. In 1978, the federal government banned lead-based paint from housing.

Lead can be found:

  • In homes in the city, country, or suburbs.
  • In apartments, single-family homes, and both private and public housing.
  • Inside and outside of the house.
  • In soil around a home. (Soil can pick up lead from exterior paint, or other sources such as past use of leaded gas in cars.)

WHERE LEAD IS LIKELY TO BE A HAZARD

  • Lead from paint chips, which you can see, and lead dust, which you can't always see, can both be serious hazards.
  • Lead-based paint that is in good condition is usually not a hazard.
  • Peeling, chipping, chalking, or cracking lead-based paint is a hazard and needs immediate attention.
  • Lead-based paint may also be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear-and-tear. These areas include:
  • Windows and window sills.
  • Doors and door frames.
  • Stairs, railings, and banisters.
  • Porches and fences.

Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry scraped, dry sanded, or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can reenter the air when people vacuum, sweep, or walk through it.

Lead in soil can be a hazard when children play in bare soil or when people bring soil into the house on their shoes. Call your state agency (see below) to find out about soil testing for lead.

CHECKING YOUR HOME FOR LEAD HAZARDS

Just knowing that a home has lead-based paint may not tell you if there is a hazard.

You can get your home checked for lead hazards in one of two ways, or both:

  • A paint inspection tells you the lead content of every painted surface in your home. It won't tell you whether the paint is a hazard or how you should deal with it.
  • A risk assessment tells you if there are any sources of serious lead exposure (such as peeling paint and lead dust). It also tells you what actions to take to address these hazards.
  • Have qualified professionals do the work. The federal government is writing standards for inspectors and risk assessors. Some states might already have standards in place. Call your state agency for help with locating qualified professionals in your area (see below).
  • Trained professionals use a range of methods when checking your home, including:
  • Visual inspection of paint condition and location.
  • Lab tests of paint samples.
  • Surface dust tests.
  • A portable x-ray fluorescence machine.

Home test kits for lead are available, but the federal government is still testing their reliability. These tests should not be the only method used before doing renovations or to assure safety.

WHAT YOU CAN DO NOW TO PROTECT YOUR FAMILY

  • If you suspect that your house has lead hazards, you can take some immediate steps to reduce your family's risk:
  • If you rent, notify your landlord of peeling or chipping paint.
  • Clean up paint chips immediately.
  • Clean floors, window frames, window sills, and other surfaces weekly. Use a mop or sponge with warm water and a general all-purpose cleaner or a cleaner made specifically for lead. REMEMBER: NEVER MIX AMMONIA AND BLEACH PRODUCTS TOGETHER SINCE THEY CAN FORM A DANGEROUS GAS.
  • Thoroughly rinse sponges and mop heads after cleaning dirty or dusty areas.
  • Wash children's hands often, especially before they eat and before nap time and bed time.
  • Keep play areas clean. Wash bottles, pacifiers, toys, and stuffed animals regularly.
  • Keep children from chewing window sills or other painted surfaces.
  • Clean or remove shoes before entering your home to avoid tracking in lead from soil.
  • Make sure children eat nutritious, low-fat meals high in iron and calcium, such as spinach and low-fat dairy products. Children with good diets absorb less lead.

HOW TO SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE LEAD HAZARDS

  • Removing lead improperly can increase the hazard to your family by spreading even more lead dust around the house.
  • Always use a professional who is trained to remove lead hazards safely.

In addition to day-to-day cleaning and good nutrition:

  • You can temporarily reduce lead hazards by taking actions like repairing damaged painted surfaces and planting grass to cover soil with high lead levels. These actions (called "interim controls") are not permanent solutions and will not eliminate all risks of exposure.
  • To permanently remove lead hazards, you must hire a lead "abatement" contractor. Abatement (or permanent hazard elimination) methods include removing, sealing, or enclosing lead-based paint with special materials. Just painting over the hazard with regular paint is not enough.
  • Always hire a person with special training for correcting lead problems--someone who knows how to do this work safely and has the proper equipment to clean up thoroughly. If possible, hire a certified lead abatement contractor. Certified contractors will employ qualified workers and follow strict safety rules as set by their state or by the federal government.

Call your state agency for help with locating qualified contractors in your area and to see if financial assistance is available.

REMODELING OR RENOVATING A HOME WITH LEAD-BASED PAINT

  • If not conducted properly, certain types of renovations can release lead from paint and dust into the air.
  • Take precautions before you begin remodeling or renovations that disturb painted surfaces (such as scraping off paint or tearing out walls):
  • Have the area tested for lead-based paint.
  • Do not use a dry scraper, belt-sander, propane torch, or heat gun to remove lead-based paint. These actions create large amounts of lead dust and fumes. Lead dust can remain in your home long after the work is done.
  • Temporarily move your family (especially children and pregnant women) out of the apartment or house until the work is done and the area is properly cleaned. If you can't move your family, at least completely seal off the work area.
  • Follow other safety measures to reduce lead hazards. You can find out about other safety measures by calling
  • 1-800-424-LEAD. Ask for the brochure "Reducing Lead Hazards When Remodeling Your Home." This brochure explains what to do before, during, and after renovations.
  • If you have already completed renovations or remodeling that could have released lead-based paint or dust, get your young
  • Children tested and follow the steps outlined above in this brochure.

OTHER SOURCES OF LEAD

  • While paint, dust, and soil are the most common lead hazards, other lead sources also exist.
  • Drinking water. Your home might have plumbing with lead or lead solder. Call your local health department or water supplier to find out about testing your water. You cannot see, smell, or taste lead, and boiling your water will not get rid of lead.

If you think your plumbing might have lead in it:

  • Use only cold water for drinking and cooking.
  • Run water for 15 to 30 seconds before drinking it, especially if you have not used your water for a few hours.
  • The job. If you work with lead, you could bring it home on your hands or clothes. Shower and change clothes before coming home. Launder your clothes separately from the rest of your family's.
  • Old painted toys and furniture.
  • Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain.
  • Lead smelters or other industries that release lead into the air.
  • Hobbies that use lead, such as making pottery or stained glass, or refinishing furniture.
  • Folk remedies that contain lead, such as "greta" and "azarcon" used to treat an upset stomach.

If you think your home has high levels of lead:

  • Get your young children tested for lead, even if they seem healthy.
  • Wash children's hands, bottles, pacifiers, and toys often.
  • Make sure children eat healthy, low-fat foods.
  • Get your home checked for lead hazards.
  • Regularly clean floors, window sills, and other surfaces.
  • Wipe soil off shoes before entering house.
  • Talk to your landlord about fixing surfaces with peeling or chipping paint.
  • Take precautions to avoid exposure to lead dust when remodeling or renovating (call 1-800-424-LEAD for guidelines). Don't use a belt-sander, propane torch, dry scraper, or dry sandpaper on painted surfaces that may contain lead. Don't try to remove lead-based paint yourself.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

The National Lead Information Center

Call 1-800-LEAD-FYI to learn how to protect children from lead poisoning.

For other information on lead hazards, call the center's clearinghouse at 1-800-424-LEAD. For the hearing impaired, call, TDD 1-800-526-5456 (FAX: 202-659-1192, Internet: [email protected]).

EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline Call 1-800-426-4791 for information about lead in drinking water.

Consumer Product Safety Commission Hotline To request information on lead in consumer products, or to report an unsafe consumer product or a product-related injury call 1-800-638-2772. (Internet: [email protected]). For the hearing impaired, call TDD 1-800-638-8270.

EPA Regional Offices

STATE HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCIES

Some cities and states have their own rules for lead-based paint activities. Check with your state agency (listed below) to see if state or local laws apply to you. Most state agencies can also provide information on finding a lead abatement firm in your area, and on possible sources of financial aid for reducing lead hazards.

State/Region Phone Number

Alabama (205) 242-5661

Alaska (907) 465-5152

Arkansas (501) 661-2534

Arizona (602) 542-7307

California (510) 450-2424

Colorado (303) 692-3012

Connecticut (203) 566-5808

Washington, DC (202) 727-9850

Delaware (302) 739-4735

Florida (904) 488-3385

Georgia (404) 657-6514

Hawaii (808) 832-5860

Idaho (208) 332-5544

Illinois (800) 545-2200

Indiana (317) 382-6662

Iowa (800) 972-2026

Kansas (913) 296-0189

Kentucky (502) 564-2154

Louisiana (504) 765-0219

Massachusetts (800) 532-9571

Maryland (410) 631-3859

Maine (207) 287-4311

Michigan (517) 335-8885

Minnesota (612) 627-5498

Mississippi (601) 960-7463

Missouri (314) 526-4911

Montana (406) 444-3671

Nebraska (402) 471-2451

Nevada (702) 687-6615

New Hampshire (603) 271-4507

New Jersey (609) 633-2043

New Mexico (505) 841-8024

New York (800) 458-1158

North Carolina (919) 715-3293

North Dakota (701) 328-5188

Ohio (614) 466-1450

Oklahoma (405) 271-5220

Pennsylvania (717) 782-2884

Rhode Island (401) 277-3424

South Carolina (803) 935-7945

South Dakota (605) 773-3153

Tennessee (615) 741-5683

Texas (512) 834-6600

Utah (801) 536-4000

Vermont (802) 863-7231

Virginia (800) 523-4019

Washington (206) 753-2556

West Virginia (304) 558-2981

Wisconsin (608) 266-5885

Wyoming (307) 777-7391

EPA REGIONAL OFFICES

Your Regional EPA Office can provide further information regarding regulations and lead protection programs.

EPA Regional Offices

Region 1 (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont)

John F. Kennedy Federal Building

One Congress Street

Boston, MA 02203

(617) 565-3420

Region 2 (New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands) Building 5

2890 Woodbridge Avenue

Edison, NJ 08837-3679

(908) 321-6671

Region 3 (Delaware, Washington DC, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia)

841 Chestnut Building

Philadelphia, PA 19107

(215) 597-9800

Region 4 (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee)

61 Alabama St., SW

Atlanta, GA 30303-3104

(404) 562-8956

Region 5 (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin)

77 West Jackson Boulevard

Chicago, IL 60604-3590

(312) 886-6003

Region 6 (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas) First Interstate Bank Tower

1445 Ross Avenue, 12th Floor, Suite 1200 Dallas, TX 75202-2733

(214) 665-7244

Region 7 (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska) 726 Minnesota Avenue

Kansas City, KS 66101

(913) 551-7020

Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming)

999 18th Street, Suite 500

Denver, CO 80202-2405

(303) 293-1603

Region 9 (Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada) 75 Hawthorne Street

San Francisco, CA 94105

(415) 744-1124

Region 10 (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Alaska) 1200 Sixth Avenue

Seattle, WA 98101

(206) 553-1200

CPSC REGIONAL OFFICES

Eastern Regional Center

6 World Trade Center

Vesey Street, Room 350

New York, NY 10048

(212) 466-1612

Central Regional Center

230 South Dearborn Street

Room 2944

Chicago, IL 60604-1601

(312) 353-8260

Western Regional Center

600 Harrison Street, Room 245

San Francisco, CA 94107

(415) 744-2966

This document is in the public domain. It may be reproduced by an individual or organization without permission. Information provided in this booklet is based upon current scientific and technical understanding of the issues presented and is reflective of the jurisdictional boundaries established by the statutes governing the co-authoring agencies. Following the advice given will not necessarily provide complete protection in all situations or against all health hazards that can be caused by lead exposure.

Lead Poison Prevention

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Everyone is at risk from lead poisoning. The greatest risk is for children under six because of their small body mass, hand to mouth behavior, developing central nervous systems, and high metabolism.

Homes built before 1978 may contain lead-based paint. If it is deteriorating, it may present a hazard through inhalation or ingestion of paint chips and lead-contaminated dust and soil.

The sale of lead-based paint for residential use has been banned since 1978. Children living in older homes with chipping or peeling paint or in older homes undergoing renovation are at risk. Lead poisoning can cause central nervous system damage, reduced attention span and behavioral problems in children. Pregnant women who are poisoned can transfer lead to a developing fetus. Lead can also harm adults.

If you suspect your child has been lead-poisoned, have a clinic or physician do a blood lead test. At city or county public health clinics, it is usually done at no charge. Pediatricians and other private doctors may be reluctant to order the test. If you have good reason to suspect your child has been lead-poisoned, insist on the test.

Many children with elevated blood lead levels show no symptoms. Possible symptoms include headache, stomachache, behavior disorders, hyperactivity or developmental delay.

If the blood lead level is less than 20 micrograms per deciliter, the usual treatment is special diet and removing the child from contact with lead-based paint hazards. A health provider can recommend appropriate therapy. One treatment is chelation, a medical procedure to remove lead from the body.

Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

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Preventing Childhood Lead Exposure

  • The U.S. paint and coatings industry, under the leadership of NPCA, is proactive in reducing the risk of lead exposure among all segments of the population.
  • There is no lead in today's household paints, and for the most part, house paints contained little or no lead as early as the late 1950s -- well before the 1978 government ban on using lead in any consumer paints.
  • The industry is also active in educating the public about how to test for lead in the environment and what to do if the source of lead is old lead paint.

LEAD RISK: HOW DOES EXPOSURE OCCUR?

There are a number of sources of lead in the environment. Contrary to common perception, direct ingestion of deteriorated, old lead-based paint -- usually by children chewing on paint chips -- has now been shown to be a rare occurrence and is not the primary source of lead exposure.

Research has also demonstrated a clear link between deteriorated housing and elevated blood-lead levels (BLLs) among residents. Such housing was generally built prior to the 1950s and is most often located in the inner cities. The total number of these housing units is estimated at about one million.

Common household dust is the most frequent pathway to exposure. This is supported by several studies, including a recent finding by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, revealing that lead is most often transmitted to humans by way of dust ingested through normal hand-to-mouth activity. Another HUD study underscored this finding by showing that controlling household dust clearly reduces risk from lead exposure.

Lead in household dust can originate from a variety of sources, including deteriorated, old lead-based paint, and soil and dust "tracked" or "blown" in from outside the residence. Often, outside soil has become contaminated by lead as a result of past usage of leaded gasolines.

Children's BLLs tend to be higher in summer, when they spend more time outdoors and when the ground is not frozen or covered with snow. Dust from outside the home is generally carried inside through opened windows and doors, and on shoes, clothing and household pets. Once in the home, the dust settles on furniture, floors and various household objects.

LEAD RISK: WHERE IS THE U.S. NOW?

A child exposed to high levels of lead may encounter various health effects, including hyperactivity, lethargy, hearing or memory loss, or learning disabilities. Though the severity and permanency of these effects have been subject to scientific debate, the potential for health risks remains.

According to a report released in July, 1998, the percentage of children ages 1 through 5 with elevated blood lead levels has fallen from 88 percent in the late 1970s to just 6 percent today. This phenomal success in reducing children's blood lead levels was reported in America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, a report compiled by eighteen federal agencies. The report documents vital statistics on the nation's 69.5 million children.

Previously, results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), were released in 1994, showing a 78 percent drop in overall blood-lead levels (BLLs) among all Americans between 1976 and 1991, from 12.8 to 2.8 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, placing the majority of the population well below the CDC's concern threshold ¾ a level of 10 micrograms ¾ for BLLs. These decreases are due in large part to the virtual elimination of lead use in household plumbing and paint, metal food containers and gasoline, as a result of industry initiatives, government actions and health education efforts.

The NHANES also revealed that certain segments of the population remain at potential risk from lead exposure, particularly poor, often minority children living in urban communities.

In February of 1997, the CDC announced that it was proposing new lead screening guidelines that will specifically target screening efforts at children who live in older homes and children from low-income families -- both populations where lead risks are more prevalent. To read the CDC release: Click Here.

LEAD-SAFE COMMUNITIES: ARE THERE SENSIBLE SOLUTIONS?

Just as science has now shown that chewing on paint chips is not the chief cause of lead exposure, it is also showing that full-scale removal of lead-based paint is not always the most effective or efficient solution.

A recent report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) confirms that lead-based paint that is well-maintained does not present a hazard and is best left undisturbed. In cases where there is paint deterioration, creating a "lead safe" home, or reducing lead exposure in an affected child, can be accomplished using a number of interim controls and permanent techniques. One option is to use "in-place management." A second is encapsulation.

Although not to be used as a permanent abatement method, in-place management -- a technique comprised of repainting, regular cleaning, dust control and personal hygiene -- has been shown to be a feasible interim approach for protecting children from lead exposure.

One promising permanent abatement technique is a new technology to effectively encapsulate old lead paint in housing. Encapsulation is increasingly being supported by regulatory agencies at the federal and state level, as a technically valid approach to lead abatement. Encapsulation as a form of abatement is particularly encouraging as a more practical and cost-effective alternative to removal.

Full removal of lead-based paint remains a very expensive option -- running as high as an estimated $35,000 per average housing unit -- and should take place only when the old lead paint has significantly deteriorated, or if earlier renovations have left lead-contaminated dust in the home.

When removal is required, it is absolutely essential that a professional contractor trained in proper lead-based paint removal handle the job. When performed by untrained, unskilled contractors, removal can increase risk by creating lead dust and releasing it into the air. Improper removal can also create new lead contamination sites where none previously existed.

Public education is crucial to the success of dust control programs. A 1994 study published in Pediatrics clearly demonstrates the positive impact counseling of parents and children -- providing instruction on sound intervention techniques -- has on reducing blood-lead levels.

HOW IS DUST CONTROL CONDUCTED?

Recommendations regarding dust control -- also known as "in-place management" -- have been compiled by the paint industry under the leadership of NPCA. The practice of in-place management is recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in regulations or guidelines offered to the public.

The paint industry recommends several steps that emphasize proper cleaning and maintenance of intact lead-based paint, i.e., paint that is not significantly deteriorated (i.e., cracked, peeling, chipped, etc.) These steps are:

  • Remove any contaminated dust with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air-filtered) vacuum.
  • Wash walls, floors and trim thoroughly with a solution of lead-specific detergent in water.
  • Repaint with two coats of high-quality paint that will provide a cleanable, durable surface.
  • Institute an ongoing program of maintenance, good housekeeping and careful attention to children's personal hygiene and hand-to-mouth activity.

Copyright ©1999 National Paint & Coatings Association. All rights reserved

The information provided or referred to as part of the NPCA Web Site is believed to be reliable and accurate. However, NPCA cannot warrant any of this information, and cannot assume any liability for actions taken or reliance on any of it.



By use of this page and its links and references, users agree that all information is provided "AS IS," that Williams Professional Painting's link to a site does not, in any way, represent or imply an approval of, or a determination of the quality of that product or service. The links provided herein are maintained by their respective organizations and they are solely responsible for their content. Users agree to hold Williams Professional Painting harmless for any and all damages arising out of use of this service and its links.

Lead In The Home

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Many house paints made before 1960 contain lead as a pigment. This lead is toxic to humans. When the paint deteriorates and as painted windows are opened and closed, paint dust containing lead is released into the home. This paint dust can be inhaled and eaten by the people living in the house. After 1960, paint manufacturers began to replace the lead pigment in paints with other non-toxic materials. It wasn't until 1978 that lead was banned from household paints. It is therefore possible that houses built before 1978 might contain lead paint, and almost certain that houses built before 1960 contain lead paint.

Children under six years of age are especially sensitive to lead poisoning. Lead poisoning causes permanent lowering of intelligence. It also causes behavioral problems such as learning disabilities, sleep disorders, headaches, and behavioral problems. About 1,700,000 childern in the United States have blood lead levels above safe limits, mostly due to lead paint in their homes. Adults may also be affected by high lead levels with headaches, high blood pressure, digestive problems, memory and concentration problems, mood changes, sleep disorders, and muscle and joint pain. It can also cause abnormal development of the child if a pregnant woman is exposed.

Simple Steps To Protect Your Family From Lead Hazards

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If you think your home has high levels of lead:

  • Have your children tested for lead, even if they seem healthy.
  • Wash children's hands, bottles, pacifiers, and toys often.
  • Make sure children eat healthy, low-fat foods.
  • Get your home checked for lead hazards.
  • Regularly clean floors, window sills, and other surfaces.
  • Wipe soil off shoes before entering house.
  • Talk to your landlord about fixing surfaces with peeling or chipping paint.
  • Take precautions to avoid exposure to lead dust when remodeling or renovating (call 1-800-424-LEAD for guidelines).
  • Don't use a belt-sander, propane torch, dry scraper, or dry sandpaper on painted surfaces that may contain lead.
  • Don't try to remove lead-based paint yourself.

LEAD INFORMATION

  • FACT: Lead exposure can harm young children and babies even before they are born.
  • FACT: Even children that seem healthy can have high levels of lead in their bodies.
  • FACT: People can get lead in their bodies by breathing or swallowing lead dust, or by eating soil or paint chips with lead in them.
  • FACT: People have many options for reducing lead hazards.
  • FACT: Removing lead-based paint improperly can increase the danger to your family.

People can get more lead in their bodies if they:

  • Put their hands or objects covered with lead dust in their mouths,
  • Eat paint chips or soil that contains lead, or
  • Breathe in lead dust (especially during renovations that disturb painted surfaces).

Lead is even more dangerous to children than adults because:

  • Babies and young children often put their hands and other objects in their mouths and these objects can have lead dust on them.
  • Children's growing bodies absorb more lead.
  • Children's developing brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead.

Did you know... ???

  • Many homes built before 1978 have lead-based paint. The federal government banned lead-based paint from housing in 1978. Some states stopped its use even earlier.
  • Lead-based paint that is in good condition is usually not a hazard.
  • Peeling, chipping, chalking, or cracking lead-based paint is a hazard and needs immediate attention.
  • Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry scraped, dry sanded or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch.
  • Settled dust can reenter the air when people vacuum, sweep, or walk through it.
  • Contaminated bare soil can also increase dust lead levels.

If lead is not detected early, children with high levels of lead in their bodies can suffer from:

  • - Damage to the brain and nervous system
  • - Behavior and learning problems (such as hyperactivity)
  • - Slowed growth
  • - Hearing Problems
  • - Headaches

Lead is also harmful to adults. Adults can suffer from:

  • - Difficulties during pregnancy
  • - Other reproductive problems (in both men and women)
  • - High blood pressure
  • - Digestive problems
  • - Nerve disorders
  • - Memory and concentration problems
  • - Muscle and joint pain

Do you have a lead poisoning prevention tip?

For more information , please call the National Lead Information Clearinghouse at

1-800-424-LEAD.

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Bob and I are very pleased with the outcome of our painting project. The house looks beautiful. Many of our neighbors have seen your work and have been very impressed. Hopefully some more work will come your way.

We want to give a big thanks to your crew. Lisa was so helpful in the color selections. She also answered many questions on other ideas and always led us int he right direction. Walter and his guys were amazing. They are true professionals and take pride in the work they do. We really appreciated all the time they spent on prepping our walls. They corrected so many of the builder's mistakes. The crown molding that was added really finishes off each room. Give a special thinks to Walter, Carlos, Edwin, Gustavo, and Daniel. Tell the guys that our dog Maisie misses them and Walter can visit her anytime.

We are planning on contacting you again in the Fall to finish off our painting project. That will be the two upstairs guest bedrooms and bath and the garage.


B. and P.

A Happy Client!

"Both of the men that you sent were excellent and I've very seldom had painters that did such a good job and were so careful. They didn't get a spot of paint on anything other than the walls and they were very polite and as I said they were very careful to cover everything they moved furniture to help me decide on a couple of things and they were very professional and very good. I didn't catch their names but I just wanted you to know that they were good and I do appreciate them. Thank you so much. "


D.A.

We have always been pleased with Williams Painting

Hi,

This week Juan completed several painting projects around our house and did a wonderful job.He was prompt, neat, and very detailed.The front stoop and trim that were repaired and painted look new (as new as a 180 year old house looks).Most impressive was the back gate.He took perfect measurements of the old rotten gate, built a new one, installed it using our historic hardware and painted it.All in an efficient and precise manner.We have always been pleased with Williams Painting and will continue to use them going forward.

Best,


J.S

A Review from Washington, DC

Ricardo and Cesar were fantastic. Prompt, professional, and kept me informed at every step. Please let their manager know.


J.K

A Professional Interior Painting Project.

Dear Rick,

It is hard to believe that just one week ago you were here to give me my estimate. Now my job is finished!

The crew (D2, Henry, and Les) were great. They were professional, clean, polite -- in a word -- gentlemen. I felt very comfortable with them working in my home. All of the work was carried out to my satisfaction, including the exterior painting and power-washing, the interior repair/caulking prep work, trim, wall, and stairwell painting.

I will definitely call Williams Professional Painting the next time I need a reliable, trustworthy, class "A" painting job!

Sincerely,

P.S. My only regret is not having used your color stylist to assist me in my paint selection.


M. T.

Interior Residential Painting McLean,VA.

Dave -

Just a note to let you know that Juan Maldonado did a very nice job for us last week. He was easy to have around and communicated well. It was a job made up of many little jobs and that’s sometimes hard to organize, but he did it! He had creative ideas when there were challenges and he always completed the project.

Thanks for getting it all done before the college party here this past Monday.

Happy Father’s Day!

A.B


A.B

Thank you for an excellent staff and for quality work!

Milton,

I wanted to send a quick note this evening to let you know how happy I am with the exterior painting work. The guys finished up tonight, working very late in order to complete everything before the heavy rain starts early tomorrow, and the house looks fantastic!

I also want you to know what a terrific team you have, so professional and always gracious. They worked meticulously each day (I don’t even think I saw them eat lunch!), and they were always ready to explain anything they were doing whenever I asked questions. My experience with your company has been wonderful and I look forward to working with you again early in 2017 to complete my interior plaster repair and painting project.

Thank you for an excellent staff and for quality work!


P.T.

Bien Hecho D2!

"Absolutely fantastic job…and the house is sparkling clean!...Everything looks perfect." Will be leaving a review on Angies' List, as well.


Mr. S

A Review for Williams Professional Painting

Great job. Courteous and professional crew. Rick oversees the project on a daily basis. My house was painted about 18 months ago. I recently noticed a small peeling spot. Rick sent someone out at their first convenience. In addition to that repair, the painter found a few other minor repairs as he is specked i in addition to that repair, the painter found a few other minor repairs as he inspected the entire exterior of my house. He did a great job and I was very pleased. Will definitely have them back when I need painting again.


G.D

A Painting Project

Dear Rick:

Dago and Eric just left. They did a wonderful job. I really love the way the bedroom looks and as for the guest bathroom, they were able to repair the plaster from the roof leak before painting the room and it looks great. I will definitely fill out a review for you and for them.

I also appreciate the help that Lisa gave us.

Please do not hesitate to give my name if people request a reference.

Best,



V.R

Outstanding work by Juan Maldonado,

Great job by Williams Professional Painting on some recent repair to our front portico (carpentry, roofing, and painting). Outstanding work by Juan Maldonado, who was the foreman and craftsman who completed the work.


T.M.

Well done, Juan!

" I want to complement Juan Maldonado for his outstanding craftsmanship and professionalism while installing a back splash in our kitchen. It will certainly add value and brighten the appearance of our home. Thank you"


Mr. T.

Review on a Recent Work

I just wanted to write and say what a nice job Walter and Gino did at our house this past week.

They were very pleasant to work with and have around.

I was very happy with the work.They were extremely focused on making sure I was happy with everything and took extra care to make things perfect.

I would happily have them back again and want to thank you for sending such a great crew to my home!


K.P.

When Sandy reached out for help with creating a new home office, we were excited to lend a hand. She had a fantastic space that just needed to be creatively reconfigured.



Sandy

We are happy to say that Ernesto and his team did a beautiful and professional paint job on our house.

We've lived in the Mount Vernon area for many years but this is the first time we've contracted with Williams Professional Painting. We are happy to say that Ernesto and his team did a beautiful and professional paint job on our house. His work was superior to any we've had done in prior years or we could have done ourselves. Ernesto was very polite and frequently asked if we had any questions or outstanding issues. We also want to commend your office staff on their professionalism and the pleasant way they handled questions. Congratulations to a top notch company and a job well done.


Kathy M.

Painting Mclean Virginia

Rick,

I wanted to write to let you know that Cristian and his team once again did an excellent job for us.Both the hallway and the nursery look beautiful.And the outside work also looks great.Even the siding ended up being a perfect match.Cristian and Jorge are so pleasant and professional.With the baby coming next week, we really appreciate you fitting us in on such a short time frame.Thank you again!



B.W.

A great review on a finished project in Washington, DC

Dave – I would just like to express my appreciation in writing for the wonderful job Williams did in the recent painting (8/19 –8/28/15) of my home. The painters worked tirelessly from early morning to late afternoon. I was fortunate in having Dagoberta D2 as the team leader. Not only was he an excellent painter but he kept me informed of the progress of the work and what I could expect each day. The work was challenging. It included removing wallpaper from two closets, one partitioned into upper and lower halves. Working in these small spaces would test one’s physical and mental toughness. Suffice it to say that both closets look like works of art now with smoothly painted walls and woodwork. The team of painters also included Erick, D1, Rodrigo, and Enrique. They were all extremely hardworking and pleasant.

While the painting of the interior has made the house look new, the exterior painting has made it look like a show house. Neither would have been possible without the help of Williams’ Designer Lisa Reyes. Lisa steered me in the right direction with color choices. I could easily still be bogged down by decisions if she had not given her stamp of approval to selections we considered early on.

Finally the work might not have gotten off the ground without the help of Jose Guzman. In the period preceding the work, Jose came to my home twice as I struggled to finalize my requests. On the day that the painting began, Jose arrived to orient Dagoberta D2 on the scope of the project, remembering even the smallest details. Throughout Jose kept in touch with me and with the team.

As a homeowner I could not have asked for a better experience with a company. I hope that I have an opportunity to work with Williams again.

Respectfully,


M.B

Williams Professional Painting

I wanted to let you know that Ricardo Salas did an “Excellent” paint job at our house. He was very professional and courteous. We will definitely be using you in the future.

Thank you,


S.A.S.

What You Should Know About Us

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Experience and Education

Take advantage of our experience and training. Have questions? Ask away! Need help? We’re here.

Honesty Is Key

No fuzzy prices or timelines. No tiny fine print. Just clear, detailed communication.

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